Art Arousal

Share your paint techniques anonymouslyNext pageArchive

lunacylover:

China, Jiangling Chu culture, Hubei province (Chinese), Zhenmushou (Two-headed antlered tomb guardian figure), 4th century BCE/3rd century BCE, wood with traces of red and black lacquer; natural antlers with traces of vermillion lacquer. [source]

(via g-uen)

TUMBLR Dashboard Slideshow!

(Source: virginwarcriminal)

blackrabbitsculpture:

Detail shots of my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture, completed early July, 2014.

I realize I mentioned writing more about the piece when I posted these, but now I can’t for the life of me remember what it was I wanted to say.

Watership Down was one of the first novels I read as a child, probably at 10 or 12. I saw the animated film soon after, and it’s clear to me that both the book and the movie made an indelible impression on me. I reread the book every two or three years, and it hasn’t lost any of its power or impact. Most of all, I’m enthralled by the rich stories the rabbits share with one another throughout the novel. My love for mythology was certainly encouraged by reading WSD as a child.

Thanks for the wonderful response to this piece so far, you amazing folks!

Materials and dimensions and all that other good stuff can be found on the turnaround photoset that’s posted on my Tumblr, right below this post.

(via nostalgica)

Cat Playing Chess

(Source: youtube.com)

Cat Eating with hands

(Source: youtube.com)

Human powered ornithopter - unsuccessful flapping test

(Source: youtube.com)

experimentsinmotion:

Olafur Eliasson’s “Riverbed” Converts a Museum into a Natural Landscape

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, known for his large-scale installations employing elemental materials like light, water, earth, and even atmosphere, transformed an entire wing of Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art into a riverbed for his first solo exhibition. The work, which uses rocks, soil, and running water to precisely emulate a natural landscape, stands in stark contrast to the white walls of one of Denmark’s most important Modernist buildings. Originally designed in 1958 by architects Jørgen Bo and Wilhlem Wohlert, the Louisiana’s staggered, irregularly sized portals create an experience that highlights movement through space. By filling the Louisiana with a landscape its galleries might have replaced, Eliasson heightens the haptic qualities of this experience and points to the reality of the museum as an institution and a physical locality. The work raises the question of how natural and built environments might intersect, though it is up to the viewer to decide whether this tension is constructive or destructive.

(via pissingonmyfeet)